Most Common Injuries from Swimming Pool Accidents

Posted by on Feb 9, 2017 in Swimming Pool Accidents

People go to swimming pools and resorts to escape from the summer heat. Swimming is a time for recreation and fun, but sometimes, it may also be a time for disaster. According to the website of the Warwick, Rhode Island personal injury lawyers of the Law Offices of Ronald J. Resmini, LTD., pool owners may be held liable for injuries and deaths that have occurred because of their negligence.

It is good to know that the law is on the side of the victims. But as an individual, you should also be responsible for your own safety, to save you from the hassles of medical bills, attorney fees, and lost time in hospitals and courts. The most common injuries from swimming pool accidents are written below so you know the risks you are getting yourself into if you are not careful enough.

Drowning
Drowning is the most obvious accident that can happen in a swimming pool. For children, drowning may occur because of the lack of supervision on the side of the parents and guardians and the lack of barriers due to the negligence on the part of the pool owners. For adults, drowning may occur because of reckless swimming on deep portions, swimming while under the influence, and unexpected circumstances such as leg cramps.

Head and Brain Injury
A person may sustain a traumatic head injury if he slips because of wet surfaces on the edges of the pool and hits his head on a hard surface. It can also be sustained because of poor diving techniques and defective diving boards and slides. The worst traumatic head injuries include brain damage. Those who are experiencing oxygen deprivation, like those who are drowning, may also sustain complications in the brain.

Fracture and sprain
Fractures and sprains can be sustained because of various reasons. They may be sustained because of diving on shallow areas, slipping on wet surfaces beside the pool, and twisting of lower body parts because of slippery pool surfaces.

Skin and lung irritation
Disinfectants such as chlorine are there to make sure that the swimming pool is safe from harmful bacteria in the water. But the improper balancing of disinfectants may be too much for humans, resulting into irritations involving the eyes, ears, skin, and lungs.

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Is DUI A Misdemeanor or Felony In South Carolina?

Posted by on Oct 11, 2016 in DUI

In whatever state of the United States you are in, driving under the influence or DUI is a serious offense that carries huge repercussions on the part of the offender. In South Carolina, DUI is an administrative and criminal offense. However, getting convicted for DUI does not necessarily mean a felony offense. According to the website of Truslow & Truslow, Attorneys at Law, DUI charges can be life altering.

In most instances, first offense DUI is usually a misdemeanor if there was no injury involved. But how does a misdemeanor DUI offense become a felony in South Carolina? There are three conditions that can result to the elevation of misdemeanor DUI to felony.

1. Death or Bodily Injury
When the DUI offense causes bodily injury or death to another person, the plaintiff commits a felony DUI. In criminal law, a bodily injury causes one of the following:

  • Permanent disfigurement
  • Loss or impairment of an organ or bodily member
  • An increased risk of death
  • When elevated to felony, the plaintiff can be subjected to a mandatory minimum prison sentence of 30 days to a maximum of 15 years and pay a fine ranging from $5,000 to $10,000.

2. A Minor Passenger
When the offender has a passenger who is below 16 years old, they may be charged with child endangerment aside from DUI. If the offense results to injury or death of the child, the offense becomes felony. The associated charge is imprisonment of up to half the time associated with DUI charge and a fine of up to half the maximum fine associated with DUI.

3, A Third Offense
A third DUI offense automatically elevates the charge into felony. A third conviction comes with a three year imprisonment and a fine of up to $12,000 when the driver’s BAC is below 0.10. For higher BAC, the fine may be increased.

A felony DUI may result to administrative penalties depending on the frequency of the offense. A first offense could result to license suspension of six months. For second conviction, it could mean indefinite suspension of the license.

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Most Common Sources of Defective Product Injury

Posted by on Jun 29, 2016 in Defective Products, Personal Injury

Consumer protection exists within our society as a set of government regulated laws that are placed in order to ensure your rights as a consumer and participant in fair trade. The Consumer Bill of Rights highlights a set of eight rights that every consumer is entitled to; the first of these is the right to safety against goods that are hazardous to life and personal property. It’s no coincidence that safeguarding from potentially harmful products is at the top of the list- unfortunately, product defects in different goods and services are not uncommon- they may occur during manufacture and assembly, they may exist in the original design of the product, or they might come about during shipping and distribution, according to the website of Williams Kherkher. Here are some of the most common sources for injury due to defective products:

  • Children’s toys: Our young ones are susceptible to misusing small parts found in the toys they play with. Choking is the leading cause of toy-related death, and the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission reported 150,000 annual visits to the emergency room by families due to toy-related injury.
  • Household products: Most don’t acknowledge the possibility of electrocution while using basic household items such as hairdryers and toasters. Faulty wiring can induce malfunctions in the product, resulting in possible electrocution or the ignition of a fire, causing burns.
  • Pharmaceuticals: Sometimes, prescription drugs cause side effects that have not been explicitly stated; with long term use, there is a high potential for heart, liver and kidney failure, cardiac arrest, lung problems, and/or brain damage.
  • Immediate injury: Immediate injuries are incurred if a product suddenly breaks; this is most common in situations where the person is elevated (i.e. a child in a high chair, someone using a ladder)
  • Safety gear: Head injuries are typical among persons using ladders or riding bikes and motorcycles. Most will be wearing a helmet in order to provide protection of the head during these activities, but this is rendered useless if the helmet is destroyed when impacted. Consumers almost never test the quality of a helmet when purchasing one because of the assumed precautions and care on the manufacturer’s end when creating safety equipment.
  • Automobiles: This is where the highest concentration of deaths due to product deficiency lies; tire explosions, faulty brakes, seatbelts, and airbags, and flammable fuel tanks are all such causes.
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