Most Common Sources of Defective Product Injury

Posted by on Jun 29, 2016 in Defective Products, Personal Injury

Consumer protection exists within our society as a set of government regulated laws that are placed in order to ensure your rights as a consumer and participant in fair trade. The Consumer Bill of Rights highlights a set of eight rights that every consumer is entitled to; the first of these is the right to safety against goods that are hazardous to life and personal property. It’s no coincidence that safeguarding from potentially harmful products is at the top of the list- unfortunately, product defects in different goods and services are not uncommon- they may occur during manufacture and assembly, they may exist in the original design of the product, or they might come about during shipping and distribution, according to the website of Williams Kherkher. Here are some of the most common sources for injury due to defective products:

  • Children’s toys: Our young ones are susceptible to misusing small parts found in the toys they play with. Choking is the leading cause of toy-related death, and the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission reported 150,000 annual visits to the emergency room by families due to toy-related injury.
  • Household products: Most don’t acknowledge the possibility of electrocution while using basic household items such as hairdryers and toasters. Faulty wiring can induce malfunctions in the product, resulting in possible electrocution or the ignition of a fire, causing burns.
  • Pharmaceuticals: Sometimes, prescription drugs cause side effects that have not been explicitly stated; with long term use, there is a high potential for heart, liver and kidney failure, cardiac arrest, lung problems, and/or brain damage.
  • Immediate injury: Immediate injuries are incurred if a product suddenly breaks; this is most common in situations where the person is elevated (i.e. a child in a high chair, someone using a ladder)
  • Safety gear: Head injuries are typical among persons using ladders or riding bikes and motorcycles. Most will be wearing a helmet in order to provide protection of the head during these activities, but this is rendered useless if the helmet is destroyed when impacted. Consumers almost never test the quality of a helmet when purchasing one because of the assumed precautions and care on the manufacturer’s end when creating safety equipment.
  • Automobiles: This is where the highest concentration of deaths due to product deficiency lies; tire explosions, faulty brakes, seatbelts, and airbags, and flammable fuel tanks are all such causes.
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